Little Known Facts about Endodontics

Little Known Facts about Endodontics

In the recent past, there was no hope for your diseased or damaged tooth. Any visit to a dentist would end up in tooth extraction. Not anymore. Today, your infected tooth can be saved through endodontic therapy. The main idea behind endodontics is to keep your natural smile by trying as much as possible to treat the root canal. Our endodontic services will ensure that you get all the help you need so that tooth stays put. But you could still be a bit skeptical about the whole saving thing, especially if a tooth is badly damaged or diseased. Having this in mind, let’s dive a bit deeper into endodontics.

Comprehending Endodontics

Endodontics goes deeper than the tooth and deals with the softer tissues known as dental pulp. The name itself comes from joining two words; inside (endo) and tooth (odont). This branch of dentistry specializes in the management and treatment of issues affecting the interior parts of the tooth. The dental pulp, which is the target of endodontics, contains:

  • Tooth’s nerves
  • Lymphatic tissue
  • Arterioles
  • Fibrous tissue
  • Venules

The goal for endodontics is to try as much as possible to make sure that your tooth can be saved. The other reason is to save you the tedious process and the costs of replacing your tooth. Our endodontist will stop the tooth from further damage by clearing the infection. Endodontic therapy is also known as root canal treatment.

When is it Appropriate to Seek Treatment?

In general, endodontic treatment becomes necessary when there is inflammation or infection of the dental pulp. This infection comes as a result of repeated dental procedures, deep tooth decay, or a crack. You might also experience the following signs and symptoms:

  • Swelling
  • Gum tenderness especially when chewing
  • Tenderness in the gingival tissues, lymph nodes, and jaw bone
  • Tooth discoloration
  • Intense tooth pain or discomfort
  • Extensive tooth sensitivity to changes in temperature

If you ignore any of the above signs and you do not get a root canal treatment, an infected pus pocket (abscess) can develop at the tooth rot and can be very painful. There are some cases where the tooth will not be aching, but the bone that holds the tooth can be severely damaged.

But there are scenarios where endodontic services would not be needed, and tooth extraction is the only solution, and these are:

  • The bone support for your tooth is not adequate
  • Inaccessible root canals
  • Restoration of the tooth is impossible
  • Severely fractured roots

How is Endodontic Treatment Done?

The endodontic procedures are undertaken in the treatment of pain in the dental pulp and the area surrounding the root. Many procedures are in endodontic treatment like:

  • Pulpotomy – this is where pulp from the pulp chamber is removed to manage the infection.
  • Root end filling
  • Surgical procedures – the most common is apicoectomy. In this procedure, our endodontist will remove the abscessed tooth together with the infected surrounding.
  • Bleaching of the enamel and dentin
  • Placement of cores to strengthen your teeth

There are instances when our endodontist will divide a tooth in half if it has two roots. Intentional replantation can be performed, where the injured tooth is extracted, repaired, and then replanted in its socket.

During these procedures, pain is managed by the use of local anesthesia; otherwise, the process would be excruciating. The upside of undergoing endodontics in South Houston is that it will not take too long for you to recover. You will be up and running a day after your visit to the endodontist.

Scheduling an appointment for endodontics in South Houston, TX can help extend the shelf life of your teeth and save you some extra dollars.

After our endodontist is through with these procedures, you will be sent back to our general dentist in EZ Dental Clinic to place a crown for the protection of the tooth. The restoration process will transform your otherwise diseased or injured tooth back to normal. Your tooth will be as good as new and function just the same. You should note that you still have to stick to proper oral care for the tooth to last a lifetime.